About the Course

A mountain biking trilogy of 3 days riding through the Tasmanian wilderness. Each day is a point to point stage with leaders expected to take 3-3.5 hours and the remainder or the field having up to approximately 8 hours to finish the route.

Some of the trails on day 2 and 3 are currently under construction and are due to open by the end of 2019. Read an exciting article on these trails here – Flow St Helens Feature The trails are still under wraps so we can’t share their GPX route with you right now, but we will as soon as they are public. Final route details released later this year.

 

 

Day 1 – Derby Mecca

The race starts from the campsite. Competitors will begin along one of the news trails, the River Trail, which will take you from Branxholm into iconic Derby. The trail here is fairly wide so you will be able to sort out your pecking order. Once in Derby, get ready for a tour of some of the most famous mountain biking trails in the world. You will hit some of the blue and green fast and flowing trails that have made Derby renowned. Weave your way through a day that is close to 55km in length and two thirds single track. The route takes you on the well known single track as well as older trails past hidden historic locations following the original dragon trail. Finish this day at the historic Weldborough pub, famous for having every Tasmanian craft beer on tap. Clean up, kick back and enjoy a beer with some classic local cuisine around a campfire with your friends.

Photo: Flow Mountain Bike

Photo: Kane Naaraat and PinkBike.com

Photo: Flow Mountain Bike

Photo: Wai Nang Poon

 

 

Day 2 – Bay of Fires

Up and ready to tackle the longest day in the race. Stage 2 starts at the Weldborough pub and you set out with a quick spin through majestic myrtle forest on a single track that can only be described as delightful. After being lulled into a false bliss, it is time to tackle the biggest ascent of the race, a huge 400m vertical climb to the top of Blue Tier following an old mining route. In parts the trail is smooth, others rough, but there are plenty of passing opportunities. Once at the top you are rewarded with 360-degree views of the East Coast of Tasmania.

Then comes a highlight of the entire event, the wilderness descent to the Bay of Fires. Don’t take our word for it, Flow Mountain Bike was recently in the area to take a sneak peek at what has been developed. “Oh yes, this is an amazing project. The 44km trail will be an epic wilderness ride, passing through three distinct zones of vegetation, it’ll be like traveling through a Tasmanian flora and fauna eco time warp on two wheels. From the Blue Tier’s lush and green wilderness, down to drier eucalypt forests with a bright white decomposed granite surface and towering boulders, there’s a lot to take in. Many areas that this track passes through are untouched by man, with no history of farming, mining or logging too. It’s not only a descent, there will be climbing and traversing along the way, but with Poimena sitting around 750m above sea level, there’s plenty of elevation to drop. As all good rides do, this one finishes with a descent. The final 8km of the trail is a real hoot, snaking through super-dry terrain and granite outcrops that litter the landscape, it sounds amazing under your tyres and rolls fast.” Read the full article here

Day 2 will be almost 60km of riding of which 70% will be on a purpose-built single track. There will be close to 1418m of elevation gain and 1774m of loss.

The stage finishes on the beach at Swimcart Beach and many riders will take the opportunity for a welcome swim in the crystal waters of the Bay of Fires.  Either catch a shuttle or ride into St Helens to Camp 3.

Photo: Flow Mountain Bike

Photo: Flow Mountain Bike

Photo: Flow Mountain Bike

 

Day 3 – St Helens Trails

Tired legs may welcome a slightly shorter Day 3 set throughout the newly built St Helens Trail Network. These astounding trails are currently being built by World Trail – the same group who built many of the Derby trails.

The days racing begins from the trailhead which is a short spin to the start line. It begins with open old mining trails before hitting what will be a classic piece of single track down Cascade Creek. A single track ascent track takes you up to Loila Tier. The trail then weaves through a landscape the original indigenous people referred to as Kunnara Kunna, “easy walking place”. To finish off, it’s a final charge down what World Trail has promised will be one of the best descents in Tasmania.

Day 3 will be almost 40km of riding of which 70% will be on the purpose-built single track. There will be close to 12500m of elevation gain and equal descent.

Photo: Jasper da Seymour

Photo: Jasper da Seymour

Photo: Kane Naaraat and PinkBike.com

Photo: Sean Scott

 

 

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